4 September 2012

"You! Yes, you behind the bikesheds, stand still laddy!"

We're finally off to take Mycroft back to school. Everything is packed. Well...everything he absolutely needs right now. I'm sure we'll deliver some things in the future, and take away others...

Sherlock is a bit quiet. Think he'll miss his big bro really. Although he's excited about this thing on Friday that Mrs N has suggested - a sort of food+drinks thing in the school grounds, with the added bonus of frog spotting.

It'll be good for parents to get to talk to her, as I'm sure all the kids there have odd little quirks and things that she's probably best warned of. Sherlock very grumpily said that Mrs T has passed on 'Sherlock's Big Book of Things Not To Do'.

So...it'll be odd, the flat being rather a lot emptier, without one fairly small (but tall) boy, and two very large dogs.

Mycroft, I saw this and thought of you:






I've printed you out a copy, so you can put it up in your room ;)

(and yes, you can have one too, dear reader, if you know what the song lyrics is from today without cheating. You will have to print it yourself, though...)

128 comments:

pandabob said...

have fun and work hard Mycroft :-)

Small Hobbit said...

I cheated and looked it up. Never realised that was part of the lyrics - although I can sing the chorus with the best of them.

And I'm sure the sentiment doesn't apply to Mycroft at all.

REReader said...

Have a good second year, Mycroft! If I recall correctly, you'll be having rather more freedoms this year, so that's a Good Thing. And texts, telephones, Skype, and emails are always available. :)

(As are we internet folks, but I'm not sure if that's a Good Thing or not, from your point of view!)

REReader said...

(And Sherlock--texts and phones and so on work in both directions... I know it's not the same thing as having Mycroft around, but as I remember last year, he'll be home for a weekend pretty soon!)

Greg Lestrade said...

He's finally got rid of us. We've left him to settle back in, find people he wants to, check out their rooms, all that sort of first-night-back stuff that needs doing.

And we're off home, where Sherlock definitely needs an early night, and I don't think John and I will be far behind.

Hoping to watch some paralympics - been keeping up as much as possible on the computer. Some absolutely amazing athlete's fighting out.

I heard that it's not shown much in the US - you lot should try and get it online or something. You're missing out!

John H. D. Watson said...

I have definite plans to doze on you while you watch it. Save the good bits for tomorrow night.

Greg Lestrade said...

Can I just watch GB's blind football? I can put the wheelchair racing off, because I might wake Mrs H...

John H. D. Watson said...

Yeah, you might need to wake me up a few times though. I literally don't think I've sat down since seven this morning until we got in the car to take Mycroft back to school.

Greg Lestrade said...

have you washed every single thing we own? And provided food for us all? And baked? You can have my domestic God title. Here, take it.

John H. D. Watson said...

No, no. By all means, keep it. Please. And thank you for turning your socks the right out.

Anon Without A Name said...

The paralympics have been stunning so far. Some absolutely mind-blowing performances, and seeing how some of the classifications work is fascinating (including the kerfuffle about blades that Oscar Pistorious started).

Can't wait for the wheelchair rugby :-)

John - sounds like you definitely deserve a quiet night dozing on your DI. Oh, and have a polar bear cub being tickled :-)

John H. D. Watson said...

That is very very cute.

Greg Lestrade said...

John's half asleep looking at cute animals, leaning on me. Sherlock, amazingly, agreed to go to bed when we got home with a book.

Can't believe we lost the footy. Amazing skills those boys have.

And I did watch the wheelchair racing...I couldn't stop myself. Wow, David Weir is absolutely amazing, so fast, so tactically brilliant.

Greg Lestrade said...

(by the way, Mycroft gave half-smirk and an unsurprised look when he saw the poster. Somehow I'm not certain he'll stick it on his door...)

Mycroft said...

Robin put it on his door, but I'm sure someone will make him take it down in the morning.

Greg Lestrade said...

There's nothing wrong with it! If they make him take it down I'll register a protest.

Mycroft said...

Do you want them to make you come and give another speech?

Greg Lestrade said...

Not about hadrons. I don't know anything about them. Except people seem to like them colliding...

You okay? Settled? Hung up all your clothes?

Mycroft said...

My clothes have been hung up, yes. I'm not sure about the rest of it.

Anonymous said...

Hope you soon feel settled, that first night is always a distinctly awful feeling, I remember it well from when I went to college. I hope you've got something good to read at least, I used to find that helped.

Lancs. Anon

Greg Lestrade said...

You know you can always call us if you need. And we can pop up and see you whenever you want.

We'll probably come and see you when you don't want, too, just to warn you.

Mycroft said...

This weekend for instance?

Lancs. Anon, thank you. I'm reading The Graveyard Book again right now.

Greg Lestrade said...

If you want us to come up this weekend, you know we'd be more than happy to.

Oh, the blind longjumping...those guys are fearless and brilliant. And the guys who ripped his trouser off - a showman too!

Mycroft said...

I'll let you know.

Anon Without A Name said...

Hi Mycroft :-) I hope you get a decent night's sleep, and that you settle in soon. I really enjoyed the graveyard Book; I remember reading Neil Gaiman's blog when he was writing it. it was quite fascinating watching the process unfold.

That polar bear is ridiculously cute, isn't it? I'm not always one for cute animals, but that one made me smile.

Lestrade - how are you settling back in to work? Not too much paperwork, I hope? (And yes, David Weir's performance was stonking. If you get the chance, you should look out for Ellie Simmonds in the 200M medley and Richard Whitehead in the T42 200M sprint, both on the C4 website).

Anonymous said...

The Graveyard Book is fantastic and apt in a way. I persuaded our English department to buy a class set after I read it!

Lancs. Anon

Anonymous said...

Will they let you put up glow in the dark stars on your ceiling, Mycroft? I did it in college and when I left they had to hold a lottery to decide which one of the undergraduates would get my room the next semester.

Do you have some other authors you like besides Neil Gaiman? I'm always interested in hearing about which authors teens are reading.

rsf

AftSO said...

"If you don't eat your meat, you can't have any pudding! How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?!?"

I never knew that word was "bikesheds." The things I learn from this blog....

REReader said...

L, I haven't seen any of the paralympics anywhere on TV here (although there were some interesting pieces in the paper this past weekend)--it's been all politics last week and this! But I'll see what I can dig up online.

Mycroft, it took me years to figure out that I should start any unpacking when I find myself alone in a new place, with some "comfort books". It's a big help, isn't it?

John, did you really have to do everything in one day?! It sounds overwhelming and I can only take my hat off to you. (Are you going to be working at the clinic again, now that the school holidays are over?)

Sherlock, I meant to ask--how are Argon and Mercury? Did they seem happy to see you? And I gather the frogs were not much in evidence during the day--what about the newts?

pandabob said...

Have a nice day at work Greg :-)

Sherlock, mycroft learn lots and lots :-)

John think about taking a day to read a book or go for a ride or have lunch in the park or something. School holidays are tough going and you've worked very hard for all of it! I know you like to keep busy and active but one day of school hours rest will do you good :-)

Anon Without A Name said...

ReRe - I don't know if it's available outside the UK, but the http://paralympics.channel4.com/ website has the main UK coverage, with live text updates, videos, etc. It'll be UK biased, but it's a commercial station, so might not have the same restrictions as the BBC stuff.

REReader said...

Thanks, Nameless, I'll give it a try!

Mycroft said...

RSF, I've just started Roman Blood by Steven Saylor and I'm enjoying that. It's a mystery set in ancient Rome and seems historically accurate to me so far, though of course I am not an expert.

Greg Lestrade said...

How's classes, Mycroft? Met many of your new teachers yet? Hope it's all going okay.

Danger, hope you're taking it easy and enjoying the sunshine.

REReader said...

And what about you, L? Are you back in the swing of things or reburried under a paper mountain?

And is school feeling nicely routine yet, Sherlock?

Anonymous said...

Saylor has a good reputation when it comes to his research. And his mysteries! I like historical mysteries too, having cut my teeth on the Brother Cadfael mysteries by Ellis Peters. I also like it when the genre gets a twist. I just read Thieftaker by D. B. Jackson, which is set in Boston just before the Revolution. The setting is accurate, one of the major incidents is historical, there are real people from the time all over the story, and the main character can cast spells... not exactly a safe quality to publicize when it isn't a hundred years since Salem was hanging witches!

rsf

Mycroft said...

Lestrade, it's going all right I suppose. We're reading Machiavelli's The Prince for one of my classes. So far it seems a bit repetitive.

Anonymous said...

Yet another reason for "Machiavellan" to be a pejorative!

rsf

Greg Lestrade said...

Just picked up a very brutal case on my return. It's not a lot of fun.

Sherlock said...

Is it a murder?

pandabob said...

Oh dear :-( I really don't know how you do your job and stay sane!

Small Hobbit said...

Sorry to hear that L.

Greg Lestrade said...

Yeah, Sherlock, a murder.

Greg Lestrade said...

Or, I should say, I think it's murder. I think the perpetrator will plead manslaughter.

Sherlock said...

Why should he get to do that?

Greg Lestrade said...

Its a bit complicated, but some people would prefer to hope for a lesser sentence by just admitting manslaughter, because it's a less serious crime, and hoping that by doing that they'll avoid going to trial. In this case, and this is all guesswork on my part because we haven't found the perpetrator yet, I think he'll say he didn't mean to kill the person, so is therefore guilty of manslaughter. We'll push for a murder charge, and somewhere between the CPS, the judge and the jury we'll hopefully get that conviction. You never know though.

Sherlock said...

Does going to prison really make people sorry for what they did?

Greg Lestrade said...

I don't think so, no. Some people are sorry, some aren't. Some become sorry, as they realise the impact of what theyve done.

Prison more often makes people regret their actions, but thats not the same.

And some people never seem sorry or regretful or anything.

Prison definitely isn't a magic answer though, and often doesnt address the real problem.

Greg Lestrade said...

I don't think so, no. Some people are sorry, some aren't. Some become sorry, as they realise the impact of what theyve done.

Prison more often makes people regret their actions, but thats not the same.

And some people never seem sorry or regretful or anything.

Prison definitely isn't a magic answer though, and often doesnt address the real problem.

Sherlock said...

What is the real problem?

Anonymous said...

I don't think there's just one problem, Sherlock. People who commit crimes have different reasons for doing them, so one answer won't ever be enough. A person who is greedy for money isn't the same as a person who just likes to hurt people, and isn't the same as a person who is trying to keep from getting hurt. Prison might be the best answer for the first and second criminal, but does it really help the third one?

rsf

Greg Lestrade said...

Well, it changes from person to person, Sherlock.

Some people have had very bad lives, and learnt from bad examples. Some people haven't had a good education and therefore have fallen into gangs or crime because they can't find a job. Some people are bullied into doing things they don't really want to do, but don't know how to remove themselves from that situation. Some need medical help because they're just not very well and it make them act violently or angrily.

Prison needs to be used more as an opportunity to remove these people from the bad parts of their life, identify the problems and then help them never go back to the people or situations that they were in before.

Then sometimes people seem truly beyond help and they need to be kept away from the public, but also away from influencing other, vulnerable, people in prison.

There are so many problems that are so hard to sort out, it's hard to explain it all.

John H. D. Watson said...

He's gone off to think about that one. Or draw bugs, I'm not sure which.

Are you doing all right?

Greg Lestrade said...

drawing bugs is probably less mind bending that sorting out the entire criminal justice system.

Yeah, doing okay. It's just...a bit hard, that's all.

John H. D. Watson said...

I think it's really irritating him that he can't work out how to fix it immediately. You should've seen him scowling at the computer.

I'm sorry. Do you get to come home soon? All I can offer is hugs.

Greg Lestrade said...

Ah, well, tell him not to fret about it. It's a big thing to think about. Just nice that he is thinking about it now, not just seeing everything very black and white, good and bad. Amazing to watch him growing up.

Yeah, home soon. Hugs will be nice.

Greg Lestrade said...

Leaving. It's good to be back on the bike :)

Need anything? I know you bought most of the supermarket yesterday...

REReader said...

I'm sorry you got hit with a nasty one, L. (I'm sorry these things happen altogether, not that that helps much.)

John--In my opinion, hugs are vitally important. (No, I really mean that.)

Sherlock, there is this: Whether prison fixes anything for perpetrators--and L has said a lot of very true things about that--it does get them off the streets, so they can't kill or hurt most other people for as long as they're in there. That may be far from ideal, but it is important in and of itself, and not to be discounted.

Mycroft, I think that, for all its faults, as one of the classics of political philosophy (most courses in that field go: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli. Quite a jump there!) The Prince has stayed surprisingly relevant over the centuries. What course are you studying it in--and what do you make of the contents?

(I'm just back from the dentist where I got a cavity filled. :( )

John H. D. Watson said...

L - no, we have more than enough food, thanks. There are even brownies left over, astonishingly.

Sherlock said...

Lestrade said that, that some people need to be kept away from the public but then I know some people are locked up in hospital that's prison too because of other things he said too and I didn't know how much stuff people do in prison and it isn't just being locked up at all.

John can we have brownie and ice cream for pudding pleeeeaaassee

John H. D. Watson said...

Do we have ice cream?

Sherlock said...

Why would you go shopping and not buy ice cream? And can we have cake and other things to take to the frog night too because if everyone likes it then we might have another one and Mrs N said she'd like it if we all asked our parents to see if it was okay for her to come and visit because she said it helps if she can see where we live and what things we have at home and I could ask Mummy but it makes more sense to ask you because you're here but you should definitely make brownies again for then.

REReader said...

What people get to do while they're in prison, what kind of prison or facility they are in, and how much they interact with other prisoners and people depends on a lot of things, Sherlock. Part of it depends on the country--different countries and jurisdictions do things a bit differently. Part depends on the type of crime--people who commit what they call white collar crime don't generally get put in the same prisons as violent criminals, for example. Part depends on whether they have mental illnesses that made them commit crimes--Lestrade mentioned that--those are the people that would be locked up in hospitals. And part depends on how dangerous they are considered, and how well they behave inside, and how much money the government is willing to spend on things for them to do, such as get some education or job training or counseling. It's really a big mishmash. Also it changes a lot with the political climate--sometimes the public wants criminals "fixed" and sometimes the public just wants criminals "punished". Sadly, there really isn't a lot of data on what really works to reduce crime.

(And I'm sure Lestrade knows more about all of this stuff than I do! He would be the best person to talk to, really, when he's not too tired and doesn't mind. I did teach a college course in criminal justice, but it was about 20 years ago.)


What a nice idea of Mrs N, to come visiting! She sounds like a teacher who is truly interested in her students, which is a very good thing indeed.

Sherlock said...

I know because some places it really is just being locked up and he told me some things people can do here but it's not enough he says and sometimes people are in prison with worse people and learn even worse things than before which is bad when they get out.

Anonymous said...

If John forgot to buy ice cream you can make some if you have the ingredients. Or it might be a neat chemistry trick to show the kids in your class at the barbecue. I bet Mrs. N knows it.

rsf

John H. D. Watson said...

Sherlock - maybe something other than brownies? That's going to be a lot of brownies this week. We can certainly take something though.

REReader said...

Yes, that is exactly what I found when I did my research before teaching that college class, and what I've seen since (I do try to keep up somewhat). And I completely agree with Lestrade that what we do is not enough and often the way it works out it makes things worse.

In a way, you can use the analogy of a medical problem. If you think of crime as being like a disease, it's like we are trying to eradicate that disease without knowing what causes it, or how it spreads, or really anything about its mechanisms or how to cure it. So all we have is ideas on how to treat the symptoms, and since it's only opinions which people don't agree on, we don't do much of anything helpful, just put people in "quarantine" with other sick people for a while and then let them out.

(If that was more confusing than helpful, just ignore that paragraph.)

Anonymous said...

Glow in the Dark Jelly?

rsf

pandabob said...

Can I ask you a question Greg? (I just have I know before you point it out ;-) )

Do you ever feel sorry for someone you arrest and gain a conviction against? You were saying about the different reasons people get into crime and it just made me wonder really whether you sometimes see people who are under pressure to do what they did or have got to where they are by means other than because they wanted to and feel a little bit sorry about what is going to happen to them.


Feel free to ignore me and get on with having a relaxing evening if you don't want to answer :-)

Jaws said...

Banana bread? It's fairly healthy and for some reason irrestible to young and old(er), plus makes the kitchen smell delectable.

Mycroft, sorry, I must disagree with you but I find The Prince brilliant, and most novels are worthy of a reread every now and again, you come to them with a fresh outlook. Do you like Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy? Or maybe try Captain Corelli's Mandolin for a novel with a historical influence, it's my favourite book, the movie didn't do it justice at all.

Greg Lestrade said...

Yeah, I do. Sometimes we say something in court, if we believe they acted under duress, or because of something which can be solved fairly easily.

The judge can order a prisoner to attend courses in prison - or at least recommend they do. Easier said than done, given prisoners can get moved around and find themselves in a prison without the correct facilities and things.

(Sherlock has informed John that he told Mrs N that he could bring in Things and Stuff for the barbecue, and she'd replied that if he couldn't be specific it wasn't very helpful... Oh, NannyJohn, what have you done to the poor boy??)

REReader said...

Perhaps you could explain "things and stuff" to Mrs N in the morning, John. (I think shed be most amused. :))

How about cupcakes or biscuits for the barbecue?

John H. D. Watson said...

I have no idea. So he told her specifically brownies?

Greg Lestrade said...

No, I think he just glowered at her. He glowered at me when I laughed.

I'm sure whatever we take will be fine. You or Sherlock can always check tomorrow. Maybe just ask sweet or savoury? Or we could do a quiche or two and some cake. Just to cover all bases.

The weather forecast is still good...

pandabob said...

Thanks for answering Greg, its sad how some peoples lives turn out :-( Whatever help prisoners need should be avaliable to them or the whole system loses its point!


Things and Stuff is specific! Mrs N will learn in time ;-)

John H. D. Watson said...

L - ah, of course. Now I understand why it's my fault.

You could make that cake you made for his sports day?

Greg Lestrade said...

I could. If you reminded me what that was...

John H. D. Watson said...

Er...it was definitely chocolate. Beyond that I'm not sure.

Greg Lestrade said...

chocolate and lavender? Probably...

Yeah, I'll do that. Sherlock can help ice it.

I keep going to call Mycroft down for dinner or shout him that I'm making coffee or something.

Miss you, Mycroft.

John H. D. Watson said...

That was it, lavender.

How much coffee do you have him drinking now? He's going to end up with a habit to rival yours...

Mycroft - yeah, what L said. Do you want to come to Sherlock's frog night, or would the school frown on you visiting home so soon?

Greg Lestrade said...

I don't 'have him' drinking it! You make me sound like a coffee-dealer, offering underhand espressos to lethargic youths - first one free, mate, but I'll 'ave to charge you after that, right?

He has maybe one or two a day, but I do make his weaker and milkier than mine.

John H. D. Watson said...

Ah, but it'll lead him to the hard stuff eventually...pretty soon he'll be drinking six shots of espresso on ice like it's nothing.

Greg Lestrade said...

I'm sure he's got more sense.

And I'm sure the most you've ever seen me do is a triple shot.

John H. D. Watson said...

Yeah, the six shooter was a man at the coffee shop today. I was impressed and bit concerned.

REReader said...

O_O

That's a lot of caffeine.


I was wondering--I know you said the martial arts class was something you thought of to occupy Sherlock during the school holidays, John, but is he going to be going ahead with that anyway?

John H. D. Watson said...

Dunno yet. Probably, but we'll let him get settled at school first.

REReader said...

That makes excellent sense--one new thing at a time. *nods*

(Of course, as a student of the martial arts myself, I'm prejudiced strongly in favor. :) Not that my opinion matters!)

Greg Lestrade said...

Ha, I can do six in a few hours. I mean, I could do six at once, but don't know what the effect it would have on me...

Danger, are all the classes at weekends? Or after school? Or evening? (Not that I'm planning what to do with free time...)

pandabob said...

I’d be less worried about the effects at the time and more worried about the crash to be honest Greg!

Greg Lestrade said...

Don't worry, there's never so little coffee in my system that I'd crash. :)

REReader said...

Even on vacation?!

Greg Lestrade said...

I do drink coffee when on holiday, yes.

pandabob said...

I gave caffeine up for lent and I had a headache for over a week due to withdrawl, you couldn't possibly go from work level to none for a holiday it would be like dying everyday :-(

REReader said...

Ah, well, holidays are for whatever makes you happy, so... :)

I have to come off caffeine for every fast day, especially the long ones--there's another coming up, as it happens. Rosh Hashanah is in less than two weeks, followed by Yom Kippur (the long fast day in question) three weeks from today. So I try to keep caffeine at low levels all the time, so it's never a big deal to cut it off.

(I don't recommend that, by the way! Although my doctor says it's a Good Thing. What does she know. :D)

John H. D. Watson said...

L - depends which place we settle on, but the one with the foam swords is pretty big and has classes most days. Kids are 'encouraged' to go twice a week, but not required.

Greg Lestrade said...

AnonyBob - I just like it too much. If I could find a really nice decaff that'd be okay, I suppose. I mean, sometimes nearly a day can pass when I just don't have time to get a cup. But it takes three days to leave your system, I think, so it's never too dire.

Greg Lestrade said...

and do you have to stay with him? Is it worth you leaving him there, or is it not long enough to get home and have any time before going back.?

REReader said...

DId Anthea check out the two places for her seal of approval?

John H. D. Watson said...

I don't have to stay, no, but I wouldn't bother going home probably. It's only a 45 minute class.

RR - I don't think Anthea really approves of either of them, but they are teaching children, not secret agents. She says they'll do.

Greg Lestrade said...

Ah ha. And is it after school? Or later?

John H. D. Watson said...

After school. The weekend classes are in the morning, I think. What are you planning?

REReader said...

If she says they'll do, they're probably quite good. :) And really, at that age, the most important thing is that Sherlock enjoys himself. Wanting to learn is the major thing, and not learning anything actively wrong.

(My own teacher has several classes for children, but New York is a bit far from London to travel for martial arts training, so... :D)

Greg Lestrade said...

Nothing! Just wondering when you'll be there. But it sounds like I'd generally be at work, if he decides to go for it.

John H. D. Watson said...

Ha. Well, there is a later class, but you'd be at work for that too. There's only weekends to work with, I'm afraid.

Greg Lestrade said...

Right. It honestly wasn't that reason I was asking. I was just asking.

John H. D. Watson said...

I believe you. I'm not sure I could get him to go if you weren't at work anyway. He hates not being there when you're home.

Greg Lestrade said...

Yeah, I hate missing you two too.

I was just thinking if you weren't going to be about I'd... do something, you know, as well.

John H. D. Watson said...

Anything in particular?

Greg Lestrade said...

No, just... I don't know, go to the gym at the yard with a friend or something.

Bed?

John H. D. Watson said...

Yeah, bed sounds good.

ryo said...

The Steven Saylor books are really good, Mycroft! Glad you've found them.

John! Have you watched any of the US Open? I know you've gone to bed, but in case you wake up in the middle of the night... the Fed could use some help. :( He's playing Berdych and struggling. Not at his usual game.

ryo

piplover said...

Last week I was working on a project at work and one of the guys was drinking this undiluted: http://www.sodastreamusa.com/TasteNutritionEnergy.aspx

The caffiene in it was making him shake, it was so much.

Mycroft, a book you may like is A Story Like the Wind by Laurens van der Post. It's an amazing book, incorporating the author's love of Africa and the political settings of the time. I found it really poignant.

Greg Lestrade said...

I think it just depends on your body's tolerance and things, doesn't it? I know people who shake after a small coffee.

But I'm definitely not a fan of getting my caffeine from anything but coffee!

piplover said...

I think it does, but he was drinking it by the capful every hour or so, so he must have been having about the equivalent of 5 or 6 Red Bulls. *Shudder* I honestly was kind of afraid he was going to give himself a heart attack.

I like my caffiene in tea form, lol, and diluted by milk! I can't even drink pop now, as it tastes too sweet and weird to me. Oh, well, better for my teeth!

Desert Wanderer said...

You'd be proud, Lestrade. I was so desperate for caffeine, I resorted to coffee yesterday. Granted with a truckload of sugar and creamer, but coffee nonetheless. Given that it's 0400 and I've alreday been awake for an hour, looks like it'll be the case again today. You're such a bad influence. ;)

Hope your case is progressing quickly, for all the right reasons.

Greg Lestrade said...

Ha, nectar of the gods!

It's not, but I'm sure we'll get there. Going to talk to someone now who I hope will help our case.

pandabob said...

I hope they were useful Greg :-) some progres would be good for you.

John H. D. Watson said...

L - do you want to get lunch in a bit if you're not too busy?

Greg Lestrade said...

Yeah, I'm just nearly back there, then have to go down to Richmond, and I was going to go on the bike, so if I meet you at the yard, we could grab lunch in Richmond first? There's a few nice delis. Afraid you'll either need to hang about or get the tube back, though.

John H. D. Watson said...

That'd be nice. We haven't ridden together in quite a while. Should I start for the yard now?

Greg Lestrade said...

Yeah, just fetching paperwork.

John H. D. Watson said...

All right, see you soon.

Desert Wanderer said...

. We haven't ridden together in quite a while

Now, Doc, knowing wjat we know about the two of you, that's a bit hard to believe...

Anonymous said...

DW, you might want to dilute that military coffee with a little hot water too. The reason I won't drink the stuff now is because I first tried it out of a pot that had been in steady use for 48 hours. (And I'd been awake for most of 'em, it was an ORI.) Sugar and creamer didn't even make a dent.

rsf

Piplover said...

I think military coffee is a whole other species. Then again, I also knew guys who, when in the field and desperate, would just eat the coffee grounds. Ugh!

Anonymous said...

I think the coffee grounds might have been easier on my stomach!

rsf

A from NW (who is always curious) said...

rsf - What's an ORI?

~A from NW

Anonymous said...

Operational Readiness Inspection. We were part-time military, so every three years we would practice putting up all our tents and gear while inspectors lurked and caused problems and found our weak points. That year they "bombed" our sleeping tents and took out all of our second shift, so we had to keep going until "replacements could arrive". I got rooked into not only doing my job, but security too, hence the coffee. It kept me awake, I grant you, but sitting in a portapotty being miserable for what felt like forever was not the kind of awake I was hoping for.

rsf

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